Colonial Housetypes - Posted by Eric in NJ

Posted by michaela-ATL on September 10, 2003 at 12:38:47:

Eric, just drive by the comps and see, if they’re similar homes.

FYI - victorian homes are usually clapboard clad houses built in the late 1800’s/early 1900’s. Some of them are called “Queen Anne’s” , which a lot of times have a turret on one of their corners, but not always.

The typical victorian has 10’ or higher ceilings, big rooms (15’x15’ or bigger), hardwood floors, fireplaces for heating. They typically have a center hallway with bedrooms on 1 side and LR, DR and Kitchen on the other. The bath, a lot of times, has been added on.

Now, if this is a victorian, check out the roof. They nused to do the roof with cedar shakes and once they had leaks, they roofed over with Fish scale shingles. If you ahve to do the roof, then be aware, that it is more expensiv than redoing a standard roof, since there’s a lot of tear off and you will have to add decking.

Michaela

Michaela

Colonial Housetypes - Posted by Eric in NJ

Posted by Eric in NJ on September 09, 2003 at 14:53:09:

I have a question about housetypes. I have a house I am preparing to make an offer on. The owner called the house a ‘200 year old victorian’. When I run comps on houses in the area 95% of them are called ‘colonial’. However in my town colonials are much smaller. Is it possible that this house could be a ‘victorian colonial’? Maybe a subtype of colonials? Iam not sure what type of house it is beyond what she says. The comp’s dont list any ‘victorians’ at all. Any ideas?

Re: Colonial Housetypes - Posted by Long Beach Ed

Posted by Long Beach Ed on September 10, 2003 at 08:37:31:

The names are used loosely and interchangably by people who have no idea what they are talking about. Don’t worry about what it is called.

Long Beach Ed

Re: Colonial Housetypes - Posted by TheShortSalePro

Posted by TheShortSalePro on September 10, 2003 at 07:46:32:

“Victorian” is often used to describe homes that are more correctly described as being a “Queen Elizabeth” style from the Victorian age.

“Colonial” is often a charming way to describe a dwelling that’s too old to age.

Your County Library or Historical Museum would have a book or two on local architectural styles…

Re: Colonial Housetypes - Posted by Eric in NJ

Posted by Eric in NJ on September 10, 2003 at 09:41:19:

Thanks for the reply TheShortSalePro. Now with the comps only showing the values of recently sold colonials, how do I determine the after repair value of this house?